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Colorado State Methamphetamine Task Force Impact


Impact made by the Colorado State Methamphetamine Task Force is reported below and categorized by each priority of the 2006 task force

Priority 1: Utilize data to specifically identify problems and issues related to methamphetamine in the State of Colorado, and utilize the data for guiding the work of the State Methamphetamine Task Force in assisting communities in implementing effective approaches for methamphetamine prevention, intervention and treatment, and environmental cleanup.

The State Methamphetamine Task Force made ample progress on the utilization of data toward the identification of problems associated with Methamphetamine and other drugs as well as Drug Endangered Children’s Issues. The SMTF formed a data committee in partnership with the Colorado Prevention Leadership Council and OMNI Institute. The data committee combined several data sources into a comprehensive report on the status of meth issues in Colorado and the Nation in November 2006. Several of the findings continue to direct the work of the State Methamphetamine Task Force, including the drafting of a follow-up data report due in November of 2008. Concurrently, Colorado Drug Endangered Children is working to create county-level data profiles with each of the local communities that are involved with the Learning Site Program


Priority 2: Review model programs that have shown the best results in Colorado and across the United States and provide information on the programs to local communities and local drug task forces.

The State Meth Task Force has had several presentations regarding model programs from Colorado and beyond:

Prevention:
Within the Colorado state government system there is an effort to coordinate prevention efforts, particularly efforts related to children and youth prevention services and programs. The Colorado Prevention Leadership Council is an interagency collaborative group that is coordinating and integrating approaches to implementing effective community-based prevention. One of the members of the Colorado Prevention Leadership Council is Stan Paprocki, Director of Prevention with the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division within the Colorado Department of Human Services, who provided members of the State Methamphetamine Task Force with information on the specific framework for community-based prevention that is shared across various state departments and is being implemented innumerous communities across the Sate of Colorado. This framework is also promoted at the national level as an effective approach for addressing methamphetamine problems within the context of the overall approach to substance abuse prevention.

Methamphetamine Cleanup:
Colleen Brisnehan, Environmental Protection Specialist with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and Brian Hlavacek, Tri-County Health Department, presented on the current approaches for conducting methamphetamine lab clean up in Colorado. Ms. Brisnehan reported on the Colorado Revised Statutes that impact environmental and health concerns related to methamphetamine manufacture and use. Existing legislation provides a directive that the State Board of Health establish clean-up standards for methamphetamine laboratories. These standards include operational requirements for clean-up activities for drug laboratories and areas of contamination, and shall be based on the 2003 guidance document for clean-up prepared by the Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.
Similarly, Mr. Brian Hlavacek reported on the Tri-County Health Department (Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Counties) Board of Health as an example of local response to methamphetamine clean-up. The Tri-County Health Department Board of Health passed regulations that incorporated the state regulations, which established the authority for the Tri-County Health Department to oversee property cleanup including performing verification sampling to ensure safe chemical levels, and manage clean-up efforts by qualified and trained contractors. In addition, the Tri-County Health Department has established safe clean-up guidelines for contaminated properties and has developed internal standard operating procedures to ensure a comprehensive health and environmental response. These standard operating procedures are written to include a multi-agency response to contaminated properties including involvement with Law Enforcement, Hazmat Team/Fire Department, Health Department, and County Social Services.

Treatment:
Treatment findings within the State of Colorado are showing success in treating those who are addicted to methamphetamine. Effective treatment options range from medical outpatient detoxification to intensive residential treatment. Carmelita Muñiz, Executive Director of the Colorado Association of Alcohol and Drug Service Providers (CAADSP), presented to the State Methamphetamine Task Force on the status of substance abuse and dependence treatment in Colorado. The CAADSP is an organization dedicated to the partnership, collaboration, and support of systems focused on substance abuse and dependence, prevention and treatment, and policy change toward improved access and quality of those systems.


Priority 3: Investigate collaborative models on protecting children and other victims of methamphetamine production, distribution, and abuse.

The work on this priority is evidenced in the Colorado Blueprint. Please click on the Blueprint Model Page for more details. In addition, the State Meth Task Force heard from a few communities in Colorado with working collaboratives:

The Fourth Judicial District Task Force discussed their coordination with the Drug Court Program on establishing a "48/7" standard that results in persons receiving their first treatment contact within forty-eight hours of arrest and a second visit within seven days.
Work in Mesa County was presented, including the 2004 "white paper" available online at methfree.mesacounty.us. In this study, Mesa County reports that 80% of the jailed inmates admitted to being high on methamphetamine at the time of their arrest. As a result of the study, the county will construct a three-story facility that will include forty-eight beds for drug addiction treatment. Mesa County is also partnering with local organizations to establish educational programs to promote healthy lifestyles. Committees were formed locally to address the problems faced by foster parents dealing with meth-exposed children and the problems related to environmental clean-up.

The Fourth Judicial District Task Force discussed their coordination with the Drug Court Program on establishing a "48/7" standard that results in persons receiving their first treatment contact within forty-eight hours of arrest and a second visit within seven days. 

Work in Mesa County was presented, including the 2004 "white paper" available online at methfree.mesacounty.us.  In this study, Mesa County reports that 80% of the jailed inmates admitted to being high on methamphetamine at the time of their arrest.  As a result of the study, the county will construct a three-story facility that will include forty-eight beds for drug addiction treatment.  Mesa County is also partnering with local organizations to establish educational programs to promote healthy lifestyles.  Committees were formed locally to address the problems faced by foster parents dealing with meth-exposed children and the problems related to environmental clean-up.

 

 



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